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International Journal of Market Research

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Dual roles of consumers: towards an insight into collaborative consumption motives [Download PDF]
Myriam Ertz, Agnès Lecompte and Fabien Durif
This article aims to investigate the consistency of the consumer motivational process in accordance with the acquisition and disposition of tangible goods through collaborative consumption. Three studies, involving a total of 7,715 consumers, show that, when considered separately, acquisition and disposition are governed by relatively similar hierarchies of motivations that can be grouped together into an overarching four-dimensional structure: (1) utilitarian, (2) experiential, (3) protester and (4) spiritual. Hence, consumers driven primarily by one or other of the four motivational categories when acquiring goods will be similarly motivated when disposing of goods. Other drivers may nonetheless represent significant secondary motivations.
[Digital First] Published 1 September 2017

Forum: Ideal and maximum length for a web survey [Download PDF]
Melanie Revilla and Carlos Ochoa
This paper aims to discover 'How long can/should a survey be?' by asking the question to respondents themselves in a web survey implemented by the Netquest fieldwork company in Mexico in 2016. It is a question that is frequently asked, even if research has already been carried out on the impact of survey length on non-response or data quality. The study conducted for this paper concluded that the ideal survey length is a median of 10 minutes and that the maximum survey length is 20 minutes. The reported lengths were significantly linked to the fact that respondents liked answering the survey and that they trusted that their data are treated in an anonymous way, but were not found to be linked to the socio-demographic variables tested, except age in the case of maximum length.
[Digital First] Published 3 August 2017

The butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker, by Roger Hutchinson [Download PDF]
Peter Mouncey Vol. 59 No. 4, 2017 pp. 537–539
This book review looks at “The butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker”, by Roger Hutchinson. The book is not an academic treatise but rather a story about the development of British society as seen through census records. It highlights interesting facets of British society such as the fact that early censuses were inaccurate and many records were lost, and that a large proportion of emigrants to the outer Empire eventually returned to Britain. The census covers a period of some of the greatest change in British social and political history. Despite being non-academic, the book demonstrates the unique value of the census for market researchers and the use of storytelling helps communicate the key findings.
Published 26 July 2017

More realism in conjoint analysis: the effect of textual noise and visual style [Download PDF]
Saul Dobney, Carlos Ochoa and Melanie Revilla Vol. 59 No. 4, 2017 pp. 495–516
The main goal of this research is to study the impact on the answers and data quality of making conjoint questions more realistic by introducing some randomised noise into the descriptions of the conjoint levels or by simulating the way an e-commerce website displays products. Conjoint analysis is an advanced market research technique commonly used to estimate preference share for products and services with different attributes and levels. A common criticism of it is in regard to the repetitive nature of the questions. In order to study this, an experiment was implemented in Spain using 1,600 respondents from the opt-in online panel Netquest. The respondents were randomly assigned to one of the following four conditions: classic conjoint design without noise (control group); classic conjoint design with some random textual and numerical noise added to the attribute level descriptions; conjoint simulating e-commerce display of products but no noise; and conjoint simulating e-commerce display and some random textual and numerical noise. The four groups were compared in terms of data quality, survey evaluation and substantive results. The results show a directional but not statistically significant improvement of quality of estimations. In terms of survey evaluation, even if the improvements are not systematic, there is a clear tendency for an improved evaluation when an e-commerce layout is used, but not when random noise is used. Substantive results are not affected.
Published 26 July 2017

Reassessing the influence of mental intangibility on consumer decision-making [Download PDF]
Ioannis Rizomyliotis, Kleopatra Konstantoulaki, Giannis Kostopoulos and Athanasios Poulis Vol. 59 No. 4, 2017 pp. 409–422
This paper explores the influence of mental intangibility on the size of the consideration set, for both tangible products and services. The research also examines the moderating effect of purchase involvement and objective knowledge on the set. Two experimental studies were conducted to examine these relations. Overall, the results indicate that mental intangibility positively influences the size of the consideration set, regardless of the offering type (product or service). This effect is stronger in low levels of knowledge. Consumer involvement does not seem to have a moderating effect on this relation. The studies' implications and recommendations for future research are also discussed.
Published 26 July 2017

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